June 14 at 3:03 PM • Comments: 2 • Views: 12788

Drinking Coffee May Lower Your Blood Uric Acid Levels

From HelloLife
  • Safely starts relieving gout symptoms such as joint pain, inflammation, stiffness, swelling and weakness
  • Provides safe, non-stimulant, non-drowsy relief without the negative side effects commonly associated with other gout symptom relief medications

Learn more about Goutinex ▶

It's true. A twelve year study has shown that coffee consumption seems to affect a man's likelihood of having gout. The study linked coffee intake to a reduced risk of gout in men with no previous history of gout.

Dr. Hyon K. Choi, MD, DrPH, and colleagues performed a twelve year study on 45,869 men, ages 40 to 75 with no prior history of gout. The study was conducted at the University of British Columbia, in Vancouver and was published in 2007.

Coffee Lowers Blood Uric Acid Levels?

The results of the study showed a direct link between increased coffee consumption and lower uric acid levels. The study determined there is no link between total caffeine consumption and uric acid levels, as it also looked for any possible effects of soda, tea, decaffeinated tea and decaffeinated coffee. Also taken into account were typical gout risk factors such as hypertension, alcohol consumption, intake of red meat and high fat dairy, and body mass index.

Study Results

The study has shown a direct link between an increase of coffee consumption and a decrease of uric acid levels. Decaffeinated coffee was shown to have the opposite effect: more cups of decaf coffee resulted in a drop of uric acid levels, but inversely. The study showed that men who drank 1 to 3 cups of regular coffee a day had a decrease of 8% in their uric acid levels.

When coffee intake rose to 4 to 5 cups, uric acid levels dropped by a dramatic 40%. 6 or more cups of coffee resulted in a 59% decrease of uric acid levels. In contrast, decaf coffee consumption of 1 to 3 cups showed a decrease of uric acid levels of 33%.

When decaf coffee intake rose to 4 or more cups, uric acid levels dropped only 27%, demonstrating an inverse relationship between decaffeinated coffee and uric acid levels.

Why Coffee?

Scientists aren't sure exactly what it is about coffee that seems to lower uric acid levels. There is a strong antioxidant in coffee called phenol chlorogenic acid, which may have something to do with it. While scientists aren't recommending an increase in coffee consumption to alleviate or prevent gout, they do acknowledge the link and see the need for future research. Studies will need to be done to isolate the component in coffee that seems to lower uric acid levels, and to determine if there's an effect in women as well as men.

Sources:
http://www.arthritis.org/research/funded-research/research-update/journal-summaries/coffee-gout-risk/

http://www.webmd.com/arthritis/news/20070525/coffee-lowers-gout-risk

From HelloLife
  • Safely starts relieving gout symptoms such as joint pain, inflammation, stiffness, swelling and weakness
  • Provides safe, non-stimulant, non-drowsy relief without the negative side effects commonly associated with other gout symptom relief medications

Learn more about Goutinex ▶

2 Comments

  • Jared Jared

    As a coffee drinker, it's so cool that some phytochemical in the coffee, apart from caffeine, is responsible for lowering uric acid level (which I write about here: http://creationbasedhealth.com/2013/11/gout-decaf-coffee.html). You mention that it might be the chlorogenic acid -- I'm excited about the prospect of researchers discovering more about all the amazing properties of the various phytochemicals contained in whole foods. Commented on HelloLife · November 21, 2013 at 2:26 PM

  • Jared Jared

    As a coffee drinker, it's so cool that some phytochemical in the coffee, apart from caffeine, is responsible for lowering uric acid level (which I write about here: Decaffeinated Coffee). You mention that it might be the chlorogenic acid -- I'm excited about the prospect of researchers discovering more about all the amazing properties of the various phytochemicals contained in whole foods. Commented on HelloLife · November 21, 2013 at 2:28 PM

You are at least 13 years of age
and agree to our terms of service.

(All Fields Required)


Comment and create a HelloLife account.  

Respond on facebook (Post to facebook and HelloLife)

Account Login Home CatalogResources
Shopping Cart:

Your cart is empty!

We're sorry, no one is currently available for online chat. Please email service@hellolife.net or call 1.800.875.0850