July 25 at 6:33 AM • Comments: 9 • Views: 50971

History Of ADHD

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  • Safely starts relieving hyperactivity, inattentiveness, and impulsivity symptoms, such as poor concentration, and difficulty reading and writing
  • Provides safe, non-stimulant relief without the negative side effects commonly associated with other OTC symptom relief medications, and is safe for use in adults and children

Learn more about Synaptol ▶

ADHD Time Line

  • 1902. ADHD was first recognized as a disorder in 1902. A British doctor, Dr. Still, documented cases of impulsive behavior. He gave the disorder its first name, "Defect of Moral Control." Despite this name, he believed that the disorder was a medical problem, not a spiritual defect.
  • 1922. It was not until 1922 that ADHD symptoms were described and diagnosed as "Post-Encephalitic Behavior Disorder."
  • 1937. In 1937 stimulants were first used to treat children who exhibited signs of ADHD. This was introduced by one Dr. Charles Bradley.
  • 1956. In 1956, Ritalin came on the market. It was used to treat children considered to be "hyperactive."
  • 1960. Throughout the 1960s, stimulants were increasingly used to treat hyperactive children. In the early part of the decade, the term "Minimal Brain Dysfunction" was used to describe the disorder, but this was changed to "Hyperkinetic Disorder of Childhood" in the later part of the decade.
  • 1970. In the 1970s, more symptoms were recognized to go along with hyperactivity. These included impulsiveness, lack of focus, daydreaming, and other lack of focus type symptoms. "Impulsiveness" as a category was divided into three subtypes: verbal, cognitive, and motor impulsiveness.
  • 1980. In 1980 the name "Attention Deficit Disorder" was invented by the American Psychiatric Association.
  • 1987. In 1987, the name was revised to "Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder".
  • 1996. In 1996, Adderall was approved to treat ADHD.
  • 1998. In 1998, the American Medical Association stated that ADHD was one of the most researched disorders, despite the fact that its cause is unknown.

ADHD Today

However, despite great leaps in understand, additional questions remain. Research is still ongoing into ADHD. Three areas of intense interest are:

  • The cause of ADHD
  • The long-term effects of stimulant medication.
  • A cure for ADHD

Alternative Treatments

Stimulants have been known to cause serious problems in children, ranging from anxiety, insomnia, and tics heart problems, emotional problems and more. Aside from the standard stimulant medications, there are many treatments for ADHD. We suggest that before settling on any treatment path, you research all the options.

Examples of alternative treatments are:

  • Diet changes. Elimination of sugar from the diet, along with supplementation of high quality proteins have, in many cases, helped both adult and children ADHD sufferers.
  • Behavioral therapy can also greatly improve behavior and eliminate some behavior problems.
  • Counseling is also important. Many children are "acting out" due to some emotional disturbance in their life, and counseling can identify these disturbances.
  • Family therapy can analyze the family dynamics at work. Some children are helped by improved relationships between them, their parents, and their siblings.
  • Biofeedback is a promising new therapy for ADHD.

Sources: http://add.about.com/cs/addthebasics/a/history.htm

Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rockcc_histcoll/

From HelloLife
  • Safely starts relieving hyperactivity, inattentiveness, and impulsivity symptoms, such as poor concentration, and difficulty reading and writing
  • Provides safe, non-stimulant relief without the negative side effects commonly associated with other OTC symptom relief medications, and is safe for use in adults and children

Learn more about Synaptol ▶

9 Comments

  • Smartliving Guest Smartliving Guest

    Would the stimulant medications, increase libido in teenagers taking this medicine for ADHD? Commented on HelloLife · February 24, 2009 at 9:36 PM

  • Smartliving Guest Smartliving Guest

    Thanks to the makers of this site, its been great for helping me with my research paper! Commented on HelloLife · January 1, 2010 at 9:41 PM

  • Smartliving Guest Smartliving Guest

    Bans i think you just have had your mind on it too much and have not let yourself have a break from worry. I suggest that you try to keep your mind off of that and then if you still feel that way you maybe should check with a doctor or something just to check up on it. With all the new information they are gathering about it it is probably more easy to tell if you have even a mild case. Wishing you all the luck and may God bless you. Commented on HelloLife · April 11, 2010 at 3:46 PM

  • Chandra Chandra

    I have ADHD so i think this is a relly good paragraph!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Commented on HelloLife · January 30, 2012 at 9:23 AM

  • Janice Janice

    I have found it to be useful to do research at least every six months on this topic since the strategies for dealing for this diagnosis is forever changing since humans are evolving every generation. Commented on HelloLife · February 2, 2012 at 8:25 PM

  • Jack Jack

    I really found this very useful Commented on HelloLife · February 3, 2012 at 4:06 PM

  • Greg Greg

    I have one word for anyone with ADHD or depression. MAGNESIUM! Research it and get some in your system. It will change your life! Commented on HelloLife · May 26, 2012 at 12:42 PM

  • Scott Scott

    Its all bull. There is no disorder. No ADD/ADHD. As a child, I was diagnosed with this fake medical/mental condition and put on many different medications. The problem was that before my diagnosis, I never got into fights, I never had problems studying and taking direction. It wasn't until some "doctor" prescribed me to be on Ritalin that I got angry and into more fights. I started getting sick more and not paying attention in school. What the "doctors" need to know is that every child learns and develops differently. The traditional structure of classes that we are used to now came to be in the late 1800's. Suddenly teachers noticed that some kids didn't "learn as well as others". So here comes some psychiatrist that knows he will never be known as anyone important and suddenly he knows what is wrong the students.
    And by the way...read the actual side effects of these "medications" they are worse than what they are supposed to "treat". Commented on HelloLife · August 29, 2013 at 7:39 PM

  • clayton clayton

    I have ADHD and I really don't like it. I take vyvance, about 2 weeks ago. And it has worked great for me so far. It also helps not to produce motor ticks, which I also have and it sucks. Stimulants help motor ticks keep on happening. Commented on HelloLife · November 1, 2013 at 12:47 PM

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